Thus, the states of the USA are not really "states" under international law.


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Posted by MARTIN on September 08, 1998 at 11:51:18:

In Reply to: 31 CFR 51.2 and 52.2 ("State" v. "state") posted by Paul Andrew Mitchell, B.A., M.S. on September 07, 1998 at 18:08:51:

State
A term of international law: those groups of people which have acquired international recognition as an independent country and which have four characteristics; permanent and large population with, generally, a common language; a defined and distinct territory; a sovereign government with effective control; and a capacity to enter into relations with other states (i.e. recognized by other states).

The USA, Canada and China are examples of states.
States are the primary subjects of international law.
The United Nations is comprised of all the states of the world.
Some large states have subdivided into smaller units each having limited legislative powers normally restricted to subjects which are more properly regulated at a local, rather than a national level.

Thus, the states of the USA are not really "states" under international law.

It is common for the general public and English dictionaries to use the word "nations" to refer to what international law calls "states."



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